Login   Iscriviti    Portale ilVolo.it    Indice Forum    Aerofan.it PhotoGallery    Cerca    FAQ    Regolamento

Il meteo su Lewes

AVIATION TOP 100 - www.avitop.com Avitop.com

Indice  »  Flight Crews Area  »  Medical Check and Human Factor

 

 


Apri un nuovo argomento Rispondi all’argomento  [ 7 messaggi ] 
Autore Messaggio
 Oggetto del messaggio: Proposta per regolare e gestire l'affaticamento dei piloti
 Messaggio Inviato: 11/09/2010, 0:41 
Turbomachinery Fluid Dynamics Engineer
Turbomachinery Fluid Dynamics Engineer
Avatar utente
Non connesso
Uomo
Iscritto il: 17/03/2008
Messaggi: 9322
Località: Location Independent
Età: 47
Fonte: U.S. Dept. of Transportation.


September 10, 2010

Landmark rule to manage pilot fatigue
will help protect 700 million air passengers each year

Today, we're announcing a significant improvement in air travel safety: a proposal to fight fatigue among commercial pilots. This will help protect the more than 700 million passengers and pilots who travel our nation's airways each year.
As you may recall, managing fatigue was a top priority in our Airline Safety Call to Action following the tragic crash of Colgan Air flight 3407 in February 2009. We held a dozen safety forums all across the US. We've talked with safety experts, aviation specialists, and fatigue scientists. And I'm pleased that we have addressed this issue.

The proposed rule also incorporates input from an Aviation Rulemaking Committee with members from labor, industry, and the FAA. As Administrator Randy Babbitt said, "Fighting fatigue is the joint responsibility of the airline and the pilot, and after years of debate, the aviation community is moving forward to give pilots the tools they need to manage fatigue and fly safely."
Key new features of the proposed rule include:
One consistent rule for domestic, international, and unscheduled flights
A nine-hour opportunity for rest prior to duty (a one-hour increase over current rules)
New approach to measuring a rest period that guarantees the opportunity for eight hours of sleep
Different requirements based on time-of-day, number of scheduled segments, flight types, time zones, and likelihood that a pilot is able to sleep
Features to manage cumulative risk include:
Weekly and monthly limits on duty time of any kind
Thirty consecutive hours free from duty every week (a 25% increase over current rules)
The proposed rule also gives pilots the right to decline an assignment if they feel fatigued--without penalty. The FAA has also prepared guidance for air carriers who are required by Congress to develop a Fatigue Risk Management Plan.
One important aspect of our proposed rulemaking is that it will be open for public comment. So please weigh in at http://www.regulations.gov.
Like our roads, America's skies are the safest they've ever been. But they must be safer, and this rule is one more step toward that goal.

_________________
'One fled, one dead, one sleeping in a gold bed' OLD RIME

Immagine


Top 
 Profilo  
 
 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: Proposta per regolare e gestire l'affaticamento dei piloti
 Messaggio Inviato: 11/09/2010, 0:42 
Turbomachinery Fluid Dynamics Engineer
Turbomachinery Fluid Dynamics Engineer
Avatar utente
Non connesso
Uomo
Iscritto il: 17/03/2008
Messaggi: 9322
Località: Location Independent
Età: 47
FAA Proposes Sweeping New Rule to Fight Pilot Fatigue

For Immediate Release

September 10, 2010
Contact: Alison Duquette
Phone: (202) 267-3883

WASHINGTON — U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Administrator Randy Babbitt today announced a landmark proposal to fight fatigue among commercial pilots by setting new flight time, duty and rest requirements based on fatigue science.

“This proposal is a significant enhancement for aviation safety,” said Secretary LaHood. “Both pilots and passengers will benefit from these proposed rules that will continue to ensure the safety of our nation’s air transportation system.”

Last year, Secretary LaHood and Administrator Babbitt identified the issue of pilot fatigue as a top priority during the Airline Safety Call to Action following the crash of Colgan Air 3407 in February 2009. Administrator Babbitt launched an aggressive effort to take advantage of the latest research on fatigue to create a new pilot flight, duty and rest proposal.

Today’s proposal is compatible with provisions in the Airline Safety and Federal Aviation Administration Extension Act of 2010, which directs the FAA to issue a regulation no later than August 1, 2011, to specify limitations on the hours of pilot flight and duty time to address problems relating to pilot fatigue.

“I know firsthand that fighting fatigue is a serious issue, and it is the joint responsibility of both the airline and the pilot,” said Administrator Babbitt. “After years of debate, the aviation community is moving forward to give pilots the tools they need to manage fatigue and fly safely.”

Currently, there are different rest requirements for domestic, international and unscheduled flights. The proposed rule would eliminate these distinctions. The proposal also sets different requirements for pilots based on the time of day and number of scheduled segments, as well as time zones, type of flights, and likelihood that a pilot is able to sleep under different circumstances.

The proposal defines “flight duty” as the period of time when a pilot reports for duty with the intention of flying an aircraft, operating a simulator or operating a flight training device. A pilot’s entire duty period can include both “flight duty” and other tasks that do not involve flight time, such as record keeping and ground training.

The FAA proposes to set a nine-hour minimum opportunity for rest prior to the duty period, a one-hour increase over the current rules. The proposed rule would establish a new method for measuring a pilot’s rest period, so that the pilot can have the chance to receive at least eight hours of sleep during that rest period. Cumulative fatigue would be addressed by placing weekly and 28-day limits on the amount of time a pilot may be assigned any type of duty. Additionally, 28-day and annual limits would be placed on flight time. Pilots would have to be given at least 30 consecutive hours free from duty on a weekly basis, a 25 percent increase over the current rules.

Congress recently mandated that all air carriers have a Fatigue Risk Management Plan (FRMP). Each carrier will be able to develop its own set of policies and procedures to reduce the risks of pilot fatigue and improve alertness. The FAA has prepared guidance material to help the airlines develop their FRMP.

The proposed rule incorporates the work of an Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) comprised of labor, industry, and FAA experts that delivered its recommendations to Administrator Babbitt on September 9, 2009.

The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking is on display today at the Federal Registerat Public Inspection Documents. It is also available at Recently Published Rulemaking Documents.

The 60-day public comment period closes on Nov. 13, 2010.

_________________
'One fled, one dead, one sleeping in a gold bed' OLD RIME

Immagine


Top 
 Profilo  
 
 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: Proposta per regolare e gestire l'affaticamento dei piloti
 Messaggio Inviato: 12/09/2010, 20:29 
Support Staff
Support Staff
Avatar utente
Non connesso
Uomo
Iscritto il: 30/04/2010
Messaggi: 4199
Località: Genova
Età: 51
Ottima idea, questo aspetto mi sta molto a cuore. Lo dico sempre, curare il benessere psicofisico dei piloti è fondamentale per mantenere e migliorare l'attuale già ottimo livello di sicurezza dei voli.

_________________
Ale

Non può piovere per sempre.


Top 
 Profilo  
 
 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: Proposta per regolare e gestire l'affaticamento dei piloti
 Messaggio Inviato: 12/09/2010, 21:56 
Military / Airline Pilot
Military / Airline Pilot
Avatar utente
Non connesso
Uomo
Iscritto il: 22/03/2008
Messaggi: 12317
Località: Roma e in giro per il mondo.
Età: 48
Pensa che nell'ambiente le stavamo aspettando per vedere cosa si inventeranno le compagnie per aggirarle... ci sono dei veri e propri artisti in questo senso, dei Maradona delle FTL! :mrgreen:

_________________
Volare è sempre meglio che lavorare!
Bombing - Duck
Il Nostro Tempo
7X

Immagine
Immagine


Top 
 Profilo  
 
 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: Proposta per regolare e gestire l'affaticamento dei piloti
 Messaggio Inviato: 13/09/2010, 8:35 
Support Staff
Support Staff
Avatar utente
Non connesso
Uomo
Iscritto il: 30/04/2010
Messaggi: 4199
Località: Genova
Età: 51
Se avevo qualche minimo dubbio indotto dall'illusione/speranza che nel comparto aereo le cose andassero meglio me lo hai risolto subito. :ouch: Poi qualcuno parla anche di pilota unico, ma lasciamo perdere se no mi viene di nuovo un attacco :muro:

_________________
Ale

Non può piovere per sempre.


Top 
 Profilo  
 
 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: Proposta per regolare e gestire l'affaticamento dei piloti
 Messaggio Inviato: 25/12/2011, 17:04 
Support Staff
Support Staff
Avatar utente
Non connesso
Uomo
Iscritto il: 30/04/2010
Messaggi: 4199
Località: Genova
Età: 51
La FAA ha emesso le nuove regole per prevenire l'affaticamento dei piloti:

http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/rulemaking/recently_published/media/2120-AJ58-FinalRule.pdf

Ecco invece come ASN riporta la notizia:

Cita:
FAA issues final rule on pilot fatigue

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued a final rule that overhauls commercial passenger airline pilot scheduling to ensure pilots have a longer opportunity for rest before they enter the cockpit. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) was pleased with the new rule but also voiced concerns on the limitation to Part 121 carriers.

Fatigue has been on the NTSB’s Most Wanted List of transportation safety improvements since 1990. The Department of Transportation identified the issue of pilot fatigue as a top priority during a 2009 airline Safety Call to Action following the crash of Colgan Air flight 3407. The FAA launched an effort to take advantage of the latest research on fatigue to create a new pilot flight, duty and rest proposal, which the agency issued on September 10, 2010. This proposed rule is now final.

The NTSB reacted in a statemtent, saying that, “while this is not a perfect rule, it is a huge improvement over the status quo for large passenger-carrying operations. Yet, we are extremely disappointed that the new rule is limited to Part 121 carriers. A tired pilot is a tired pilot, whether there are 10 paying customers on board or 100, whether the payload is passengers or pallets.”

The estimated cost of this rule to the aviation industry is $297 million but the benefits are estimated between $247- $470 million. Covering cargo operators under the new rule would be too costly compared to the benefits generated in this portion of the industry. Some cargo airlines already have improved rest facilities for pilots to use while cargo is loaded and unloaded during night time operations. The FAA encourages cargo operators to opt into the new rule voluntarily, which would require them to comply with all of its provisions.

Key components of this final rule for commercial passenger flights include:

Varying flight and duty requirements based on what time the pilot’s day begins.
The new rule incorporates the latest fatigue science to set different requirements for pilot flight time, duty period and rest based on the time of day pilots begin their first flight, the number of scheduled flight segments and the number of time zones they cross. The previous rules included different rest requirements for domestic, international and unscheduled flights. Those differences were not necessarily consistent across different types of passenger flights, and did not take into account factors such as start time and time zone crossings.

Flight duty period.
The allowable length of a flight duty period depends on when the pilot’s day begins and the number of flight segments he or she is expected to fly, and ranges from 9-14 hours for single crew operations. The flight duty period begins when a flightcrew member is required to report for duty, with the intention of conducting a flight and ends when the aircraft is parked after the last flight. It includes the period of time before a flight or between flights that a pilot is working without an intervening rest period. Flight duty includes deadhead transportation, training in an aircraft or flight simulator, and airport standby or reserve duty if these tasks occur before a flight or between flights without an intervening required rest period.

Flight time limits of eight or nine hours.
The FAA limits flight time – when the plane is moving under its own power before, during or after flight – to eight or nine hours depending on the start time of the pilot’s entire flight duty period.

10-hour minimum rest period.
The rule sets a 10-hour minimum rest period prior to the flight duty period, a two-hour increase over the old rules. The new rule also mandates that a pilot must have an opportunity for eight hours of uninterrupted sleep within the 10-hour rest period.

New cumulative flight duty and flight time limits.
The new rule addresses potential cumulative fatigue by placing weekly and 28-day limits on the amount of time a pilot may be assigned any type of flight duty. The rule also places 28-day and annual limits on actual flight time. It also requires that pilots have at least 30 consecutive hours free from duty on a weekly basis, a 25 percent increase over the old rules.

Fitness for duty.
The FAA expects pilots and airlines to take joint responsibility when considering if a pilot is fit for duty, including fatigue resulting from pre-duty activities such as commuting. At the beginning of each flight segment, a pilot is required to affirmatively state his or her fitness for duty. If a pilot reports he or she is fatigued and unfit for duty, the airline must remove that pilot from duty immediately.

Fatigue Risk Management System.
An airline may develop an alternative way of mitigating fatigue based on science and using data that must be validated by the FAA and continuously monitored.

In 2010, Congress mandated a Fatigue Risk Management Plan (FRMP) for all airlines and they have developed these plans based on FAA guidance materials. An FRMP provides education for pilots and airlines to help address the effects of fatigue which can be caused by overwork, commuting, or other activities. Airlines will be required to train pilots about the potential effects of commuting.

Required training updates every two years will include fatigue mitigation measures, sleep fundamentals and the impact to a pilot’s performance. The training will also address how fatigue is influenced by lifestyle – including nutrition, exercise, and family life – as well as by sleep disorders and the impact of commuting.

The final rule has been sent to the Federal Register for display and publication. It is currently available at: http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies...alRule.pdf, and will take effect in two years to allow commercial passenger airline operators time to transition.



Ma scusate, la FAA restringe i limiti e EASA invece li vuole allargare? :scratch:

_________________
Ale

Non può piovere per sempre.


Top 
 Profilo  
 
 Oggetto del messaggio: Re: Proposta per regolare e gestire l'affaticamento dei piloti
 Messaggio Inviato: 04/01/2012, 10:07 
Support Staff
Support Staff
Avatar utente
Non connesso
Uomo
Iscritto il: 30/04/2010
Messaggi: 4199
Località: Genova
Età: 51
Cito un articolo in italiano sulla questione:

Cita:
Quella del 21 dicembre 2011 rimarrà per sempre una data storica per i Piloti delle Aerolinee statunitensi, che dopo quasi 25 anni di rivendicazioni e battaglie legali condotte dall’Air Line Pilots Association – ALPA – vedono finalmente la FAA/USA pubblicare la propria definitiva norma regolamentare sulle “ore di volo e di servizio”, che apporta una radicale modifica alle precedenti vetuste regole in materia del riposo che dev’essere goduto dai Piloti delle Linee Aeree approvate per il trasporto pubblico di passeggeri, sia quello “regolare” (scheduled) che “a domanda” (charter).



Questa volta la normativa in materia è stata decisa sulla base di appositi studi, ricerche e test condotti scientificamente.



Le Compagnie Aeree statunitensi avranno a disposizione un tempo massimo di 2 anni per conformarsi alle nuove norme approvate, che impongono ai Piloti di avere 10 ore minime di riposo (2 ore in più che in precedenza) prima di intraprendere un volo.



Inoltre, la nuova normativa operativa definisce ex novo il “tempo di servizio di volo”, includendo in esso qualsiasi servizio “di trasferimento fuori servizio” comandato dalla Compagnia, come pure il tempo trascorso all’addestramento, al simulatore di volo [dato che “addestramento in volo” non se ne fa più, per tagliare i costi delle ore di volo ! – ndr] e qualsiasi altro impiego assegnato dalla Compagnia.



Ed ancora, ciascun Pilota dovrà aver goduto di 30 ore consecutive libere dal servizio su base settimanale (con un incremento di circa il 25% rispetto alle precedenti norme) ed anche nuovi limiti mensili di volo.



Un’altra grande novità consiste nel fatto che ciascun Pilota, prima di iniziare il servizio di volo assegnato, debba firmare sul piano di volo approvato che “egli o ella si dichiara idoneo fisicamente al servizio di volo” !



L’Aerolinea da parte sua dovrà provvedere all’immediata sostituzione di coloro che abbiano “determinato” di non essere in condizioni di volare [non è detto se con successivi riscontri medici – ndr].



Ecco, … fin qui le rose, ma poi esistono anche le spine !



Infatti, la nuova regolamentazione non si applica ai Piloti che affrontano lunghe ore di volo “fuori servizio” per recarsi all’aeroporto dove dovranno prendere servizio attivo per la Compagnia di appartenenza e neppure si applica … - udite, udite ! –



ai Piloti delle Compagnie Aeree Cargo ed Air Taxi !



Il Segretario al Department of Transportation USA ha definito questa approvata dalla FAA una “regolamentazione scientifica” che rimarrà una pietra miliare atta a «garantire ai piloti l’opportunità di avere l’appropriato riposo fisico prima di entrare nuovamente nella cabina di pilotaggio di un aeroplano».



Ha poi giustificato l’esclusione dai benefici della legge dei Piloti assegnati ai voli cargo e di lavoro di aerotaxi definendo “troppo costosa” la loro eventuale inclusione nel pacchetto pattuito per poterne “giustificare per legge i benefici dell’eventuale inclusione anche di quel settore”, ma che comunque avrebbe già deciso di convocare una riunione, nel mese di Gennaio, con i Capi delle Aerolinee del settore Cargo per invitarli ad adottare volontariamente la nuova regolamentazione. Con ciò implicitamente riconoscendo la necessità di tutelare la sicurezza anche dei Piloti di quel settore dalle conseguenze, già per lungo tempo sperimentate, degli effetti della stanchezza fisica e della mancanza di adeguato riposo rigenerante.



Mossa tipicamente politica, che dimostra … che tutto il mondo è paese e che gli “interessi forti” prevalgono sempre su quelli della … sicurezza del volo !



La FAA a sua volta dichiara di aver fatto una propria analisi valutativa dei costi collegati all’innovazione regolamentare, stimandone il costo relativo da affrontare da parte delle Compagnie Aeree USA nell’ordine di 297 milioni di $, ma di valutare tra 247 e 470 milioni di $ i benefici economici, nell’arco di 10 anni, derivanti dalla nuova legislazione, attraverso la riduzione dei disastri aerei provocati dalla stanchezza dei Piloti.



L’ALPA, mentre si dichiara soddisfatta per i Piloti delle Linee Aere di trasporto passeggeri, esprime amara delusione per l’esclusione dei Piloti di aeromobili Cargo, mentre i Piloti appartenenti alla “Indipendent Pilot Association” che rappresenta i Piloti dell’UPS (trasporti postali e merci) si dichiara decisamente preoccupata perché «così si consente ai Piloti degli aeromobili cargo, potenzialmente affaticati, a condividere e a “competere” lo stesso spazio aereo con Piloti appropriatamente riposati, creandosi così un inutile pericolo per la pubblica incolumità».



Da parte mia debbo però rilevare di non aver mai sentito né ALPA né IPA una sola parola di preoccupazione o di protesta (anche per la potenziale perdita di posti di lavoro !) nel dover condividere lo spazio aereo nazionale degli USA con gli UAS/UAV, ammessi a volare senza ancora aver raggiunto la maturità sulla quale si basa la tecnologia del “sense and avoid” !

Non sarebbe dunque il caso di esternare anche questo tipo di preoccupazione per la sicurezza dei cieli statunitensi ?


http://www.aerohabitat.org/index.php?page=1&id=397&cat=9

E così, se ci sono soldi, ben vengano le regole, altrimenti (cargo) lasciamo pure le cose come stanno, tanto su quei voli i capoccioni non salgono.

_________________
Ale

Non può piovere per sempre.


Top 
 Profilo  
 
Visualizza ultimi messaggi:  Ordina per  
 
Apri un nuovo argomento Rispondi all’argomento  [ 7 messaggi ] 

Indice  »  Flight Crews Area  »  Medical Check and Human Factor


 

Chi c’è in linea

Visitano il forum: Nessuno e 1 ospite

 
 

 
Non puoi aprire nuovi argomenti
Non puoi rispondere negli argomenti
Non puoi modificare i tuoi messaggi
Non puoi cancellare i tuoi messaggi
Non puoi inviare allegati

Cerca per:
Vai a: